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Lesson 60

Love Somebody: Left Hand and Hands Together

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50 Comments

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Julia

    Hi Mr. Hoffman!
    I noticed there are recommendations to use metronome in some of the practice lessons from Unit 4 (for Spinning song, for example). I would like to use metronome for practising the songs from Unit 3 as well. Could you please recommend what bpm to use for each of them (plus Mary Had a Little Lamb)?
    I discovered that using metronome is so helpful for understanding and controlling the speed you are playing with. Will you be providing metronome settings for the upcoming songs?
    Thank you!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      We’ll make suggestions for metronome settings for some of the songs, but probably not all of them. I can give you an approximation for the bpm used in the practice tracks for the unit 3 songs and Mary had a Little Lamb, though. Silver Birch Tree and Cuckoo are both about about 110 bpm, Grinding Corn and Love Somebody are a little faster, about 140 bpm, and Mary Had a Little Lamb is around 145 bpm. Of course, you don’t necessarily need to play them at a specific speed. I’d recommend just experimenting with the metronome for each song to find a speed that feels right to you. I hope that helps!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Miranda

    Hi Mr Hoffman. I’ve just finished unit 3, my children are racing each other through unit 2 trying to catch me up. I can’t find a certificate to print for the end of unit 3… it’s not so much for me (who am I kidding, got to love a certificate)… but is there a unit 3 certificate anywhere?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Hi! We’re glad to year you and your family are enjoying the lessons. Unfortunately, though we updated the first two units, we haven’t gotten around to re-doing the unit three videos or materials yet so there isn’t a unit 3 certificate.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Birat

    Mr. Hoffman, Your method to teach Piano is great. I trying hard to follow you here in Kathmandu, Nepal. What I am wondering to know is, in lesson you have told & shows keys remain in Q (one after another in a line) when we press triad chord that is chord I. What I have found is quite different ! In all triad chord keys does not remain in Q i.e., with some DFA, DF#A & EG#B. I have not checked all. Triad like DFA, DF#A, EGB it happens as your taught. Hope you may satisfy my query shortly.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you! We’re so glad you’re enjoying the lessons. A triad chord can be made up of any three keys. For a I chord, if you’re playing in a major pentascale, you always play Do, Mi, and So. For example, the I chord for D major is D,F#,A. If you’re playing in a minor pentascale, the I chord has a “Me” instead of a “Mi” which is a half step lower, so if you’re playing in D minor, the chord is D,F,A. I hope that helps! Let me know if I didn’t answer your question and I’ll do my best to clarify.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Brandon

    what is the difference between a 5/7 chord and a 7 chord?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a great question! You’ll learn more about different chords in later units, so don’t worry if this seems a little complicated right now. A V7 chord is a chord with a root that’s a 5th interval (five notes up the scale) above Do, that includes a 7th interval in the chord. So, for example, the V7 chord for the key of C is G7, which can include the notes G, B, D, and F (which is a 7th interval above G). A vii chord (seven chord) is a chord with a root that’s a 7th interval above Do. So in the key of C, the vii chord is a B diminished chord. That’s different, though from a C7 chord. A C7 chord is just a C chord with a B (which is a 7th interval above C) added in. I hope that helps! Let us know if that didn’t make sense, or if you have any other questions.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mandy

    Mr. Hoffman I have learned how to play all the pretty little horses la cinquentaine vivache Mary had a little lamb.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Wow, that’s really impressive! Keep up the amazing work! 🙂

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Liza

    For the chord I can i jit use finger 1 and 5 instead of using 3

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Yes! It’s good to practice playing the full triad, though, if you can. 🙂

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Landry

    Mr Hoffman thankyou for teaching me that lesson it was good

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re very welcome! I’m glad you liked it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mom

    I saw in an earlier lesson that you’re LDS. I’m trying to learn to play the music for primary. I’m at lesson 60. About what lesson do you think I’ll know enough to start playing the songs from the children’s songbook?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a great goal to have! The songs in the Children’s Songbook (and Hymns) are surprisingly difficult. There are a handful of easier ones hidden in there (like “Book of Mormon Stories” is a pretty easy one, comparatively, or hymns like “Sweet Hour of Prayer”), but most are hard enough to require 4+ years of learning. I would say that you want to get to around Unit 10 before tackling hymns or primary songs. Of course, you can find simplified versions like “Hymns Made Easy” which you could start tackling around Unit 6 (lessons 101-120), I think. -Mr Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Rious

    Hi Mr Hoffman ….
    In the first right key node is E, than you play it with E as Do, then we play E pentascale ….
    is this also apply to all son sheet ? (the first right key is Do)
    if not, is there any way which pentascale that we must play it in a song ?
    thanks and regards …..

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a great question! That actually doesn’t always apply. On most sheet music, at the left end of each line by the clef, there will be a group of either sharps or flats. That is called the key signature. The key signature tells you what key you’re in and where the sharps or flats are in that key. The pentascale you’ll play in depends both on where your hand is positioned, and what key you’re playing in. For the first several units, however, your finger one will almost always be on Do, so you don’t have to worry about it yet. I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Vivi

    Helo Mr Hoffman. Can you make More puppet,pleas?
    Because I Love it! (Eliana- 6yo)

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      I’m so glad you enjoy the puppets! You’ll find lots more sketches at the end of each lesson starting in Unit 4. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    David

    Great point about moving the whole hand more deeply into the keys. I find myself having to fix this problem for many of my students. I don’t think I’ve run across this point of technique in the other method books

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks for the feedback – I’ve felt the same way.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    SYDNEY

    DEAR MR. HOFFMAN, I DID WHAT YOU TOLD US TO DO IN LESSON 60. I DID THE SONG LOVE SOMEBODY HANDS TOGETHER, AND I TOLD MY MOM THAT I LOVED HER! IT MADE HER SO HAPPY! THANK YOU!!!!
    SYDNEY 🙂

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s wonderful! Thanks for sharing.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Guilherme

    Hello Mr.Hoffman.I’m 13 and I want to thank you because play piano was my dream and now by your help I can finally play the Prelude no.1 by J.S.Bach.
    PS:I’ve just learned to speak English so please don’t mind my mistakes.Thank you very much Mr.Hoffman!!!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Christeen

    Dear Mr. Hoffman
    Thank you very much for your great lessons.
    Could you plz tell me according to what I can choose the chord?
    Thx a lot

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Kitta

    Are the worksheets to the right of the video the same as the worksheets you tell us to download?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Yes, that’s right. The “Complete Materials” are the worksheets I talk about in the lessons for download.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Petra

    So ready for Unit 4! Thanks for working on more lessons for us!!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Ana

    Hello mr hoffman it is a pleasure to learn from your lessons I can’t wait for the next units! One suggestion though can you get more songs like Dinah lesson 36 was great thank you soooo much for all the hard work you put into these lessons but a lot don’t have the funny jokes or puppets at the end, thanks for the lessons and have a great day!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Kelly

    We found your site after a keyboard for Christmas. 2 of my 4 kids have finished lesson 60 and continue to practice and play. We are thrilled and can’t wait for more lesson. My kids think you are a wonderful teacher and my husband and I are thrilled. Thank you,! Thank you!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      What kind and inspiring words! Thank you for letting me know that you have enjoyed the first 60 lessons. I am working hard on Unit 4, and look forward to sharing it with you and your kids! Best, Joseph Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Aaron J Hostetler

    Good morning I am twelve,this morning I just finished lesson 60, I really enjoyed them.I am looking forward for unit 4 and 5 thanks for your hard work.Do you know were I could find a good guitar teacher?God Bless.Aaron.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Francis

    Dear Mr.Hoffman

    I am 69 years old and playing the keyboard in the churches since from 20 years old. I could not learn it systematically. But with my own effort and through some books I improved my musical knowledge. I am an Indian and recently in UK at Leeds. I came through your web site and listened to all your 60 lessons and I really learnt a lot about the details of time signature and 5/7 chords. Since I didn’t have a key I watched and listened to your lessons. April 1st I will be in India, Bangalore I will practice all the 60 lessons. Thank you very much. What should I do for further lessons? Kindly let me know. Thank you.
    Francis Jerome.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Hello Francis, Thank you for your message. I am currently working on Units 4 and 5 with lessons going up to 100. Unit 4 will be ready by May 2014. Thanks for watching and learning with me! Best, Mr. Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mansukh Patel

    Dear Mr. Hoffman sir.
    Good morning. How are you?–I think you will be so fine. First of all thank you so much for the great job.
    As you know I am your student of 65 years old and on 3rd -January-14. I have completed all the 60 lessons. I am very exited.
    I am practicing everyday 2 hrs on Keyboard.
    One thing I am confused that –What is difference between Penta scale & Pentatonic scale?
    One other thing that you played a title music on the beginning of every lesson that notation I would like to review & I want to play on my keyboard. It is very charmful to listen.
    Thanks.
    Yours sincerely.
    Mansukh Patel.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Hello Mansukh, Congratulations on completing Lesson 60! Sounds like you have been working very hard to develop your musical skills. A pentascale is a series of 5 notes, all 1 step apart. For example, CDEFG makes the C Major Pentascale. A Pentatonic scale is a series of 5 notes built purely on Major 2nds and Minor 3rds. One example of a pentatonic scale would be the following notes: C, D, E, G, and A. A pentatonic scale is also formed simply by playing all the black keys on the piano. The song I play at the beginning of each video is called “All of Me” by Jon Schmidt. He has a website where you can download his music. Thanks for learning with me!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Cathy

    Thank you for the great lessons! I finished Lesson 60 today and I’m really grateful that I found your website. I’m 47 years old and I knew nothing about playing the piano when I started with Lesson 1. I like the progression of the lessons and that fact that Mr Hoffman was teaching both the theory as well as the practice. Can’t wait to see the lessons that will come out in April 2014.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Oliverio

    Mr. Hoffman, you are the best teacher. I am 65 years old and I play the guitar. All my life I have been playing by ear cause I never had any body teach me the correct way. Recently I was given an old antique Grinnell Bros player piano. I was so lucky to have found your web site cause now I know how to read music.You have the best method of teaching and making it fun while learning. I just went through the 60 lessons and I have learned more in a week than I have learn in my 65 years of playing the guitar. I am going to go back to lesson 1 and start all over and make sure that I don’t forget what I have learned. Thank You very much and my God keep you safe and strong so that you can teach people music.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Christian

    Dear Mr. Hoffman,
    I found your website after trying three different piano teachers who collectively inspired my daughter to mediocrity and disinterest. It was immediately obvious that you were just what I had been looking for in an instructor. With your lessons, both my 7yo daughter and I have fallen in love with piano. Your joy and enthusiasm for music is obvious and contagious. Just what I had been hoping for. Now the question: We’ve completed all the lessons, purchased all the additional material and worked through it… now we are lost. I don’t know where to go and my daughter and I are both faltering in our practice and progression without direction. Do you have any strong suggestions for how to follow up on your wonderful lessons? How do we and what should we do to continue practicing? Where do we find more songs to learn to keep my daughter interested? My sincere thanks in advance for any response.
    With great respect,
    Christian & Lily Anderson in Florida

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Hi Christian and Lily,
      Thanks for your kind words. I am thrilled that my program has inspired a love for piano in you both! I am so sorry that I don’t yet have more lessons to offer you! I am committed to filming more lessons, and I hope to have Unit 4 (with 20 more lessons) ready by April 2014. What can you do in the mean time? It wouldn’t be a bad idea to review some of the lessons, or it may be time to try and find a live teacher. I know it can be tricky to find a teacher you love, but with persistence, it’s possible. Here’s an article on finding a good live teacher: https://www.hoffmanacademy.com/blog/how-to-find-a-piano-teacher/ Whatever you choose, I hope you won’t lose the love for making music and that this can be a life-long adventure for you! Warm regards, Joseph Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    tracey

    THANK YOU for the 60 lessons ! But I did not find out where I can download music worksheets. My students really need them because they are old enough to read music notes .I was planning on surprising them with the work sheets. Thanks!
    Yours sincerely,
    Tracey

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Hi Tracey,

      All our sheet music can be downloaded after purchase from our store, see the link below, or just click the graphic in the upper right-hand corner of this page that says “Complete Materials for Lesson 1,” or click “STORE” on the top menu bar.

      https://www.hoffmanacademy.com/store/

      Enjoy!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Isabelle

    Hello Mr Hoffman,

    Well, I’d like to thank you for the great job you have been achieving. What a pleasure and how simple it is to learn the piano with your method of teaching!
    Thank you for these 60 lessons . I really hope you have another unit in mind.
    Yours sincerely,
    Isabelle.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Julie

    Great point about moving the whole hand more deeply into the keys. I find myself having to fix this problem for many of my students. I don’t think I’ve run across this point of technique in the other method books.