Lesson 38

The V7 Chord

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114 Comments

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Peter Shepherd

    Hi Mr Hoffman! Is it okay to play a V7 chord twice sometimes when I play it in Dinah?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Yes! That’s perfectly fine.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    john

    i love the end .the 110924 chord hahahaha

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      I’m glad you liked it. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Kurt

    Dinah is fun to play and guess what i have an h at the end of my name just like dinah

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s cool! I’m glad you enjoy playing “Dinah”.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mary

    Mr. Hoffmen can you pllllleeeeeaaaaaassssseeeee add the Hamster song to the song/tutorial list

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      I’ll add it to the list. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Tabitha

    This was my first song that I played along with chords and I must say, I was thrilled when I had mastered the V7 chord !! It was an amazing experience trying to learn it…… Thank you Mr. Hoffman ?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re very welcome! We’re so glad you enjoyed the lesson. πŸ™‚

      • Hoffman Academy logo
        Hoffman Academy

        That’s a great question! The V or “five” part of the chord comes from the fact that the root of the chord is a fifth interval above Do. The 7 part comes from the fact that you use a 7th interval in the chord. So for example, in the key of C, the V7 chord uses the notes from a G chord with a 7th interval (an F#) thrown in. I hope that helps! You’ll learn about this subject in more detail later on, so don’t worry if it’s a little confusing right now.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks! I’m glad you enjoyed it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Luis

    I was having a Piano teacher here in Germany six months 30.00 Euros for 45 mins three times a week, here I have just Unit II and I have more progress in two Weeks as the whole six months that she was teaching me! Great Job mr. Hofmann! I love Hofmann Academy!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you! We’re glad to have you learning with us, and hope you continue to enjoy the program. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    grant

    Funny ending it made me laugh so hard!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Talia

    I composed my own song and it only has 11 measures. Is that long enough?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Yes! 11 measures is a perfectly good length for a song. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Elaine

    It’s impossible that my mum is in unit 9!!!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Lee

    Agree with a number of comments around the quality of the teaching. Thank you very much. You are an excellent teacher for all ages, and your methodology comprehensively combines rhythm with ear, with timing. Love the rhythm methodology. This is an area that I have never been able to understand until now, and never been able to count effectively. Also being more conscious of listening and actually hearing a note, instead of just reading the sheet music is most valuable. Cheers

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you so much! We’re happy to have you learning with us, and I’m glad you’re finding the lessons helpful. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Kasey

    Hello mr Hoffman I still need to practice my v7 chord with Dinah but my mom says that I’m very good. But I still need to practice to master it. I am still very good!? because I listened to you carefully in this video!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s wonderful! I’m so glad to hear you’re on your way to mastering the V7 chord. Keep up the great work! πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Liza

    Im finding it very hard because i dont have weighted keys and my fingers are to small; in addition on pinkie finker is always locking/playing flat on the piano whilst i do the task what should i do? Move on to the next lesson?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      It’s fine to move on to the next lesson, even if you don’t feel like you’ve perfected this one. There are also some exercises you can do to help with tension and finger strength. Try starting practice time with a little bit of gentle finger stretching. Open and close your hands several times, then shake them out and let them hang loose. Then, while playing, make a conscious effort to keep each finger in a relaxed, curved shape. Don’t worry if it takes a while to get the hang of it–just be patient with yourself and keep working at it. You can also try this exercise: Step away from the piano for a minute and find a hard surface like a table or your piano bench. Rest your fingers on the surface in a relaxed, curved position, then gently lift each finger one at a time while keeping your other fingers and wrist relaxed and still. Also, try applying gentle pressure to the surface one finger at a time – there should be basically no movement in your hand, but you’ll feel your muscles working as each finger presses down. These may seem like little things, but it’s a great way to focus on developing correct finger posture and to develop your muscles. I’d also recommend you review our blog post about keeping fingers relaxed at the keyboard. I hope that helps!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Shikha

    The best video tutorials I found on internet. I have a very keen interest in music so I started learning piano 5-6 months back, and got so much confidence through your video tutorials that I started my own classes and have 4 students already. Thank you Mr. Hoffman. πŸ™‚

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re very welcome! I’m so glad you’re finding the lessons helpful. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Steve

    I meant to include this with the prior comment to illustrate what I derived from your answer.

    G major: G B D.

    V7 = D7 (D = 5th degree): Fβ™― C D
    (derived from the “do” half-step down, “mi” half-step up, and “so” remains the same method).

    And by this reasoning therefore:

    β€’ C β€” V7 β€” G7.
    β€’ D β€” V7 β€” A7.
    β€’ E β€” V7 β€” B7.
    β€’ F β€” V7 β€” C7.
    β€’ G β€” V7 β€” D7.
    β€’ A β€” V7 β€” E7.
    β€’ B β€” V7 β€” Fβ™―7.

    Please let me know what you think. Thanks again.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Yes, that’s correct!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mom

    Thanks for the awesome lesson! How do I share my video?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      We’re glad you enjoyed it! We used to have a recital hall where students could post videos, but unfortunately it isn’t working right now. We hope to get it up and running again in the future, but in the meantime, you could post a video on our Facebook page or on YouTube. Make sure to let us know if you do so we can go check it out! ?

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Steve

    The V7 chord is labeled D7 on the β€œDinah” lead sheet, why is it labeled this instead of G7, after all we are deriving it from the G major chord? In other words, how do we determine the correct name for the V7 chord?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      The root of the V7 chord is the note a fifth interval from the “home base” note of the key you’re playing in. So for example if you’re playing in C, the V7 chord is G7, and if you’re playing in D, it’s A7, and so forth. I hope that helps!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Steve

    How do we typically spell a V7 chord? Would you please spell the following V7 chords for C major, G major, and F major.
    I bought a book for chords, and it’s supposed to be especially exhaustive in its naming and presentation of piano chords; however, when I attempted to find the C major V7 chord I did not see it listed. Is there another common name for the C major V7 chord? And is it contained somewhere in the following list:

    C chords (listed by 1/2 steps): NB: A slash ( / ) when spelling chords means inversions, e.g.,
    C major. Root position: C E G.
    1st inversion: C/E = E G C.
    2nd inversion: C/G = G C E.
    C augmented.

    Csus4.

    C6. NB: from C6 – C major7 3 inversions

    C7.

    C07.

    C major7.

    C minor.

    C minor6. NB: except for β€œC minor” 3 inversions

    C minor7.

    C minor7β™­5.

    C minor (major7)

    C chords using both hands (listed by 1/2 steps):

    C7β™­9.
    C7β™―9.

    C9.
    C9sus4.
    C9β™­5.
    C9β™―5.
    C9β™―11.

    C13
    C13sus4.
    C13β™­5.
    C13β™―5.
    C13β™­9.
    C13β™―9.

    C13β™­5β™­9.
    C13β™­5β™―9.

    C13β™―5β™­9.
    C13β™―5β™―9.

    C6/9.

    C major9.
    C major9β™―11.

    C major13.

    C major13β™­5.
    C major13β™―5.

    C major13β™­9.
    C major13β™―9.

    C major13β™­5β™­9.
    C major13β™­5β™―9.

    C major13β™―5β™­9.
    C major13β™―5β™―9.

    C minor7β™­9.

    C minor9.

    C ninor11.

    C minor13.

    C minor9 (major7).

    Also, if you can shed some more light on this “process” or “system” for spelling and naming chords, it would be greatly appreciated; every bit of knowledge helps to add one more piece to the puzzle of music.

    Thanks as always for everything you do! And finally, do you think you could create a “method” for notifying us when an answer is given; i.e., Such as e-mailing a link to your answer in the lesson when you give it.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a good question. There isn’t really such a thing as a “CV7” chord. The “V” or “5” part means that the root of the chord is a fifth above Do. For example, G is a fifth above C so in the key of C, the V7 chord is actually G7. In the key of D, it would be A7, and so on. The “7” part means that you add a 7th interval into the chord. So a G7 chord can include any notes in the G chord (G, B, D) but will also include F, which is a seventh above G. I hope that helps!

    • Hand-drawn avatar
      Steve

      Your explanation helped a lot. I truthfully don’t completely understand it yet, but 90% there. If you ever want to create a lesson for this, I’m sure it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very much for your answer.
      Steve

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Morgan

    Is the 11900 and 24 cord real?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Those sound like they would be pretty difficult chords to play. πŸ™‚ But no, they don’t exist. Types of chords won’t have numbers in them higher than 7 because there are only 7 different notes in a major scale.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Faith

    Why are some of the notes lines facing downward?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a great question! On sheet music, if your notes are on the bottom part of the staff the lines point up, and if you’re on the top part of the staff, the lines point down. That makes it look a little less messy because you don’t have notes with lines sticking out too far off the edge of the staff. I hope that helps!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Anthony

    I want to express my heartfelt gratitude to Joseph and to his lovely wife for this brilliant idea and to everyone at Hoffman Academy. I am a 35yr old Nigerian male who has tried almost every piano lesson on the internet. I must say the quality and level of engagement is second to none. I came accross this website only three days ago. I am actually reading music, playing melodies and chords together. wow wow wow. Thank you soo much. Everyone needs to know about Hoffman Academy. you have literally changed music education. i have learnt in three days what i have been trying to make sense of in years. You make it become soo easy. Soo glad i didnt give it. I could not thank you enough. Kids must love this and adults too.. I knew all the theory but something seemed mysterious. you have brought out the best in me. I just want to play the piano all day long. Thanks again. I have told my friend to sign his kids up. Big Hugs and lots of love to you and your family. Have a merry christmas.. xxx

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you so much! We’re happy to have you learning with us, and glad that you’re finding the lessons helpful. Good luck and happy playing!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks! I’m glad you liked it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    miguel

    isn’t it V7 = G7? so it has to be G-B-D-F? I’m confuse now

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s right! In the key of C major, the V7 chord includes the notes G, B, D, and F, (Or just B, F, and G if you use the method taught in the video to get to the chord.) However, in this lesson, we’re playing in G major, so the V7 chord in this case is F#, A, C, and D or just F#, C, and D. I hope that helps, and we’re sorry for the confusion.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    miguel

    isn’t it the V7 missing notes?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re right that the V7 chord can also include Re as well as Ti, Fa, and So. In this case, to make it easier, we decided to use only three of the four notes that can be included in the chord. I hope that helps!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Jefferson

    I am so much happy cause for the first time I could read a music sheet. Thank you Mr.Hoffman. I am from Brazil and I am 37 years old. I am studying music because here in your site I have this opportunity and because I believe music is art and art will help me and others understand life better using soul and feelings.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you! I’m glad you’re enjoying the lessons, and we’re so happy to have you learning with us. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Bailey

    This was fun and sounded great ?

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      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks! I’m glad you liked it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    RACHEL

    This is such an excellent lesson! Thank you! It is not too hard and you explain with so much patience. I like the strange V7 chord.

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      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you! I’m so glad you enjoyed the lesson and found it helpful.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Bren

    My goal was 10,000 points, and I did it! That was a funny puppet show you put at the end of this video lesson.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Great job getting all those points! And thank you, I’m glad you liked the finger puppets at the end of the lesson. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Taylor

    The puppet video at the end of this lesson was the funniest one yet! Hysterical!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks! I’m glad you enjoyed it!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    DIGVIJAY

    Dear SIR, Could you please explain why we say F-sharp and not G-flat to the First key of the V7 chord. In the G Minor Pentascale you called a half step down from B as Bflat, so i was expecting similar logic.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman academy

      That’s a great question! While it’s true we use flats in the G minor scale (G-Ab-B-C-D-Eb-F), the full G major scale uses sharps (G-A-B-C-D-E-F#). This is done to avoid using the same letter twice in the same scale. For example, if we called it “Gb” then we’d have both “G” and “Gb” in the scale. I hope that helps! Let us know if you have any more questions!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Sudheer

    Dear Hoffman,

    Why there is # symbol at the beginning of each treble staff?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      The # symbol at the beginning of each line is called a key signature. A key signature tells you what key the song is written in. In this case, because there is just one # and it is on the F line, it indicates that the song is in G Major.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Alexis Sorensen

    Oh no. It’s your father that is my father in law.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s right! I’m happy to have your family learning with us. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Alexis Sorensen

    Did you know that mr. Hoffman is my father in law!?

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Naqi

    I’m confused a little bit when u explained about the music notes on V7 chord. For finger no 5 on left hand when playing this chord should it be on G Base instead of F Sharp since u move half step downward like u explained before in the minor pentascale lesson?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Since we are working in the G major pentascale for this song, the 1 Chord in the left hand is G, B, and D with finger no. 5 on G. To find the V7 chord for G major, start from the 1 Chord position and you will move your finger no. 5 down a 1/2 step to F# and move finger no. 2 up a 1/2 step to C. Your left hand should now be playing F#, C, and D with finger no. 5 on F#. This is the V7 chord in the G major pentascale. I hope this helps clarify. Happy Playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Jango

    Will you please consider teaching the starwars theme?

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Savannah

    I’m getting used to playing it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    zoe

    I did the V7 Chord on rain come wet me and I loved it. you are the best piano teacher ever . it was hard at first but then I got it thanks Mr Hoffman

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      I’m so glad you kept at it! I’m so happy to be your piano teacher. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Susan

    Hello Mr. Hoffman,
    My name is Sylvester D’Silva. I have been learning with you since I was 5 years old. I am now at unit 3. I practice every day and I love playing the piano. You are a great teacher! Thank you very much.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Hello, Sylvester! I’m very impressed that you practice every day – that is a very important step to becoming a great pianist. And I’m very happy to hear that you love playing! That’s super important, too. We’re very glad to have you learning with us.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    kristi

    Would you do the theme from Angry Birds “Friends?”

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks for the feedback. We have our songs planned out pretty far, but I’ll put it on the list of possibilities for the future.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Mike

    Hello, so after i practiced this chord with my left hand and was satisfied i could play it with relative ease, i decided to switch hands and try to do the same chord with my right hand. I found that the switch from the 1 chord to the 5 chord with my right hand was much more awkward. Should i be able to play the chord with both hands or is it primarily for the left hand? Thanks.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re right that the V7 chord can feel awkward in the right hand. This is due to the fact that the chord uses both finger 4 and finger 5 at the same time, which most people feel are naturally weaker than their other fingers. Is it useful to learn to play the V7 chord in the right hand? Certainly! Even though it is most common in music to play chords in the left hand, part of why we practice is to be prepared for any circumstance, and there certainly are many times when the right hand is required to play chords. I think if you practice it enough times, in a matter of a few days the awkwardness will fade away. I hope this helps!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      We have a couple of different studios we use to film the lessons, and several of our studios have different colored walls…just to give things some variety. πŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Amad

    Hi Mr.Hoffman,
    Thank you for your lessons. Is there a way to subscribe to get these material for lower price than buying them separately for each unit. Your way of teaching is fabulous!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    JESSIE

    thanks for teaching me a lot of piano stuff…..its really fun for me!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Alyssa

    Thank you for teaching me how to play the piano. I already know how to play part of Amazing Grace. Thank you!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Sandeep

    Thank you Mr. Hoffman for the wonderful online course. I’ve learnt more from this course than from any other online resource.

    I was trying to do the chords and the melody at the same time, and it’s turning out to be so hard to do! I can do the chords by themselves , OR the melody by itself with ease. But doing both together seems to be near-impossible. Any tips to make it easier?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      First of all – congratulations on your hard work and great progress! Here are a few things to consider (though, I realize you may be doing some of these already):

      – Practice the chords alone while singing the melody; practice the melody alone by saying the chord name out loud at the right points in the measure while you play.
      – If you have purchased our Complete Materials, listen to the audio files and play along with the practice track, one hand at a time.
      – Play hands together *very slowly* – imagine a turtle crawling through honey if that helps! πŸ™‚ Once you can play it perfectly that way, increase the speed a tiny bit and try again…and again. Each time, only slightly increase your speed once you’ve mastered it more slowly first. Eventually you will find yourself “up to tempo” – at normal speed – playing it just right!
      – Be patient with yourself. Learning to play two different things at once is difficult and may take some time to get used to. It’s amazing to think about all the growing going on in your brain when you’re mastering a new skill like this. If you keep working at it, I know you will improve. It’s going to be a great feeling when you’re playing hands together!

      I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing. – Mr. Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Tara

    Why are there two chords played in the last measure of the top line of Dinah. The V7 is played followed quickly by the I chord. I thought only one chord was played per measure. Thanks!

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      Hoffman Academy

      Great question. There is no rule about how many chords can be played per measure; the only requirement is that the number of counts adds up correctly to the number of beats per measure, according to the song’s time signature. – Mr. Hoffman

      • Hand-drawn avatar
        Tara

        Interesting! Thank you for clearing that up!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Ashi

    As far as I remember it was written a D7 where you said this time that is V7..
    I don’t understand it..Can you please explain?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Good question. It’s basically 2 names for the same thing. In the key of G (Dinah is in the key of G), D7 is the V7 chord. – Mr. Hoffman

      • Hand-drawn avatar
        Ashi

        Hi Mr. Hoffman, I didn’t understand what you explained..
        Can you please give a complementary answer?

        • Hoffman Academy logo
          Hoffman Academy

          Sure! First of all, remember that the “V” in the V7 chord isn’t a letter, but a Roman numeral, so it really means the five-seven chord. In the key of G, that means the notes D, F#, A, and C (I’ll explain more about why chords have the names they do in a later lesson–it’s a bit technical). To make it easier to play in this lesson, we put the D on top, and we leave out the A, so the notes are F#, C, and D.

          We’ll get more into the nitty gritty of chords as we progress, but I have found that most students learn better later if small pieces of those concepts are introduced in the beginning lessons. I’m sorry if it was confusing. Feel free to contact me at Support@HoffmanAcademy.com if you have further questions. – Mr. Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Araceli

    Hi!you do a great job, thank you!!
    My daughters love when you end the lesson with a short histories.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    brogan

    Can you play frog in the middle in all the pentascale

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    brogan

    when i go to srtech my finger its hard to switch fast.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Switching between chords can be tricky at first, so don’t try to do it fast right away. Start very, very slowly (pretend you’re in slow motion or under a magic slowness spell!) and work on it until you can do it perfectly. Then turn up the speed just a notch until it’s perfected again. You can make huge improvements if you take the time to start slow and practice this way. I hope that helps! – Mr. Hoffman

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      Yes, chords can be very tricky! Just keep practicing, and eventually it will start to feel easy–I promise! Also, it’s OK to move on to more lessons and come back and try it again later, too. Thanks for watching!

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Joseph Hoffman

      No, although the chords are similar. Gsus4 has these pitches: G, C, and D. The V7 in G major (which is also called D7) has these pitches: F-sharp, C, and D (and often A, too, but in this lesson we omit the A ).