Lesson 54

Grinding Corn

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31 Comments

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Caroline

    Mr. Hoffman can you please reach us how to play The Greatest Showman: A Million Dreams. I really hope you do I love that song. It is my favorite non-christian song. Also can you please do Love Is an Open Door off of FROZEN. Thank you so much.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks for the suggestions! I’ll add them to our list of requested songs for future lessons.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Birat

    Mr. Hoffman, Somehow I am able to sing your taught songs and play notes too. What I am wondering & struggling to get is, clue to sing and play piano with other songs(not taught). Would you please kindly guide me with your brilliant information & suggestions?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thanks for the question! Learning to play songs on your own involves skills like playing by ear and sight reading. Playing by ear takes time and effort to develop, but if you’re patient with yourself it can be a lot of fun. Start by thinking of some simple songs that you know and try to figure out the notes on the piano. It will probably take some trial and error at the beginning, but with practice, playing songs by ear will get easier. Eventually, you may even get to the point where you can play songs by ear with hands together. Sight-reading is also a valuable skill to develop. Once you can sight read, you can play any song so long as you have sheet music. You can find some beginning sheet music here that you can use to practice your sight reading. I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Birat

    Mr. Hoffman, Your great Piano teaching method is guiding me to learn here another part of the globe that is in Kathmandu, Nepal at the age of 58. What I am wondering is, yet you have not come a cross any lesson for Key Signatures! Where, using them in Treble & Bass chef. You have used them in this lesson too. Would you kindly explain enough to understand and follow properly.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Hi! You will learn more about key signatures eventually, but I can explain some of the basics for now. The purpose of a key signature is to tell you what key you’re playing in. The collection of sharps or flats that make up the key signature correspond with which notes in that key are sharp or flat. So, for example, if the key signature has just one flat on the B line, you know you’re playing in the F major key because F major just has one flat, which is B-flat. The key signature also tells you which notes are sharp or flat in the song. For example, if you’re in the key of F major, then whenever a B is written in the sheet music, you’ll actually play a B-flat. This makes writing music simpler, because you don’t have to put a sharp or flat symbol in front of every note that is sharp or flat. I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing. đŸ™‚

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Landry

    Thank you for teaching it mr Hoffman . It was a super good lesson

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      You’re very welcome! I’m glad you liked it.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Shreya

    Mr. Hoffman ,

    How I know which song best fits on which pentascale ?

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a really good question. It’s not so much about what pentascale is best for the song, it’s about what key the sheet music is written in. If you look on the sheet music for “Grinding Corn” at the beginning of the line right between the treble clef and the 2/4 time signature, there’s a little “b” symbol. That symbol indicates that we’ll be playing the song in F major. Different arrangements of “#”s and “b”s at the beginning of each line of music (called key signatures) indicate different keys or pentascales to play in. You don’t need to know what any of the key signatures are yet–we’ll cover more about that in later units. For the time being, I’ll let you know in the lessons what pentascale we’ll be playing in. I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing!

      • Hand-drawn avatar
        Shreya

        Dear Mr. Hoffman thank you for a nice explanation and giving us such a wonderful tutorials

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Dina

    Mr. Hoffman, I love the way you teach. I feel like because I found you I will finally be able , at 75, to learn how to play piano. I have only one question. What is the benefit to read a do like a sol and so forth. It is confusing to me but I’m sure there is a reason for it. Thank you. Dina

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Thank you! I’m glad you’re enjoying the lessons! I believe solfege to be beneficial because it helps with transposing music and developing a sense of the relationships between notes in a scale. Our blog post, What is Solfege? gives a more in-depth explanation of how solfege works and why it’s a good thing for musicians to learn. I hope that answers your question. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Abraham

    Hi Hoffman, I noticed the downloaded bundle doesn’t have practice CDs for “grinding corn” and “love somebody” in your download, instead there are only listening CDs for these songs. Is this intended?
    Thanks.

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      That’s a great question! As students get more advanced in their playing, I like to have them gain experience playing purely by themselves, without accompaniment. Playing with an accompaniment is a great way to help a student learn to feel and stick with a steady beat. But I also want them to have the chance to develop the skill of keeping a steady beat without any outside help at all. In most units going forward, there will continue to be some pieces or songs that don’t have an accompanying Practice Track. I hope this helps! Thanks for learning with me! – Mr. Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    EMMANEUEL

    Dear Mr. Hoffman

    I have actually seen some types of corn that are not completely yellow.
    There is a type that has some greyish colored kernels.

    Regards
    Emman ????

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Winnie

    Hello Mr. Hoffman,
    I have a question…. Should the whole rest in measure 5, 6, 7, and 8 be half rest since the time signature is 2/4, two beats in each measure? Instead of the upside down hats, should it be the right side up hats? Thanks! – Winnie

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Great question! Whole rests are a bit of an anomaly in music. They can mean 4 beats in some contexts, but they can also mean 1 entire measure, regardless of how many beats are in the measure, whether you are in 2/4, 3/4, etc. You just have to use context to figure out how a whole rest is being used in any certain circumstance. I hope that makes sense. Good luck and happy playing!

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Dilini

    Dear sir,
    I’m 23.I’d like to play piano, but I don’t have enough money to join to a music class.so I don’t know how to start, after I listen & practice your lesson on my friend’s piano…:-
    now I can play this song too…using my both hands.
    I’m very glad to you sir.
    If you didn’t do this I could never play a piano.

    Thanks you very much.

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    Miriam

    Grinding corn is now my favorite song so far on Hoffman academy, thank you Mr. Hoffman.
    your pupil in piano
    Miriam

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    brogan

    can you play mousey in all Pentascale

    • Hoffman Academy logo
      Hoffman Academy

      Yes, I can… and I’ll bet, with some practice, you can too! – Mr. Hoffman

      • Hand-drawn avatar
        brogan

        That’s awesome and I’ve mastered frog in the middle on all the Pentascales.

        • Hoffman Academy logo
          Hoffman Academy

          Congratulations! That takes a great deal of hard work; I am very impressed. – Mr. Hoffman

  • Hand-drawn avatar
    O'Shea

    Thank you Joseph Hoffman for giving me and my little sister these wonderful lessons!

    Truly,
    O’Shea & his Sis, Jojo

    • Hand-drawn avatar
      Xocolatina

      First Thank you very much for the wonderful lessons.
      I have a question similar to Shreya’s one. That “b” at the beginnig means always the song is playing in F Mayor? I ask because looking where the “b” is placed, this is the line for “C”. Isn’t it?

      • Hoffman Academy logo
        Hoffman Academy

        It’a little blurry in the video, but the “b” symbol is actually on the line for B. It indicates that there is a Bb (B-flat) in the key we’re playing in. The reason we know it’s F major is because there’s a Bb in the F major pentascale. Does that make sense?