LESSON 50 Cuckoo: Left Hand

What you'll learn

Learn the left hand notes for Cuckoo
Review B-flat in the F pentascale

Casio Privia

Mr. Hoffman's Top Pick for Digital Piano: Casio Privia PX-150

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12 Responses

    • I’m sorry to hear that. Could you tell me what in particular was confusion? You can comment here or send an email to Support@Hoffman Academy.com. We’re happy to help!

  1. Sir,

    I always use to write the music with your lessons, and then practice, and i noticed that after writing the music on sheet then practice not only help in remembering but remembered for long time as well.

    • That is fantastic! Our brains tend to thrive on multi-sensory learning – that means you learn or practice the same thing in several different ways. When you add the reading and writing of creating your own sheet music to the watching and listening of the video lessons and the physical activity of practicing at the piano, you give your mind more ways to learn and more opportunities to grow. I’m impressed by your initiative and am glad that you are recognizing the fruits of your efforts. Great work!

    • That’s a great question. It has to do with the fact that solfège can be used in very different ways. In some countries, a fixed Do system is used, where Do always means C. It sounds like this is how you were first taught. However, I find it most helpful as a teacher to teach using both a fixed system (ABCDEFG) and a movable system (Do, Re, Mi, etc). Some kind of fixed system is essential to provide structure and certainty. D is always a D on the piano or on any instrument. However, a movable system is best for helping students easily hear and recognize the function of each note in a scale and relationships between each note in a melody, no matter what key the music is in. So, I try to give my students the best of both worlds by actively using letter names as a fixed system and solfège as a movable system. You can learn more about solfège and how I use it in the Hoffman Method here: http://www.hoffmanacademy.com/blog/what-is-solfege. I hope that helps! Good luck and happy playing. – Mr. Hoffman

      • Awesome answer! Thanks for sharing your precious time. I have always been self-taught and had very rough to none music theory background playing guitar by ear. But now I got my piano and want to be become good at music. Thank you Mr. Hoffman I will follow your advise.

  2. Very amazing! I thought it would just be chords, but with actual tunes, it’s amazing! I can’t wait to try this in front of my whole family, next week! they’re gonna be so amazed! Thanks Hoffman for all you’ve done,

    Sincerely, O’shea
    & Jojo

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